dam, drinking water, drought, economy, groundwater, international, rivers, sustainability, technology

Turkey, Iraq, and Syria to Form Collaborative Water Institute

The Middle East is an area rich in oil reserves but without ample water supplies to sustain a growing populace. Over 21 politically distinct countries and jurisdictions maintain 5% of the world’s total inhabitants with less than 1% of the world’s water reserves. At times, coming to an agreement on how to share the three river systems (the Jordan, Nile, and Tigris-Euphrates) that traverse the region make water policy a virtual nightmare. Now three countries are coming forward to resolve past arguments on transboundary water issues.

Turkey, Iraq, and Syria will soon form an institute to study water in the Middle East, as detailed in Today’s Zaman (a major Turkish newspaper). Experts, scholars, and professionals from each country will begin meetings at Turkey’s Atatürk Dam to share information and work on resolving past water-allocation problems.

Goals of the institute include:

  • Develop and share information on irrigation and potable water technology.
  • Map water resources in the Middle East.
  • Release a report on effective water management in each country (for release on April 15th).

Management of water storage and dams in the region will be an aspect of the institute’s endeavors. Turkey and Syria will attempt joint construction of a dam on the Asi River. Syria expressed an interest in greater downstream shares from dams on the Euphrates River. Iraq, which had previously filed concerns against Turkey’s dams on the Tigris and Euphrates, approved the construction on the controversial Ilisu Dam on the Tigris River. Also, see this post on Intercontinental Cry on the contested Ilisu Dam and related protests in Turkey.


Above Photo: Ted Thornton at History of the Middle East Database.

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international, rivers

Is the Amazon longer than the Nile?

The prospect of categorizing large rivers of the world was more difficult than one might imagine because of standing controversy regarding lengths of the supposed longest rivers of the world.

Rivers are meandering in nature, changing shape, with tributaries that may be disputed as part of the original waterways. This list compiled on Wikipedia is great because it groups large river systems by length including the tributaries. Maybe, in the future, satellite images from space could be analyzed for an accurate portrayal of river length.

Other compilations have differing views that list tributaries separately or highlight disputed tributaries. Now, geographers say, Is the Amazon longer than the Nile?