Drink Tap Water to Give Kids Clean Water

donation, drinking water, outreach, sanitation, unicef

As the rainy season wanes in the Pacific Northwest, our water-focused student club at Oregon State University has decided to promote the UNICEF Tap Project. The Tap Project, which began in 2007, is held during World Water Week from March 21st to March 27th. The aim is bring awareness to and collect donations for water and sanitation challenges faced by children around the world. Nearly 4,100 children die each day from water-related illnesses. Through the Tap Project, restaurants collect one dollar for each glass of tap water usually served for free and provide these donations to UNICEF.


Above Photo: Tap Project volunteer looking for participating restaurants.

We spent a couple of days walking around encouraging restaurants and coffeehouses to get involved. Four restaurants and two coffeehouses have agreed to participate. This is the first year of the Tap Project in our area. Restaurants are a great venue to reach a diverse group of people. The campaign might present the opportunity for someone in the United States to think about a young child in Zambia (or Bangladesh, India, Sudan… ) and their lack of water and/or sanitation. And, with the UNICEF Tap Project, we are giving people the chance to help alleviate the suffering of children worldwide.

If you want to engage your city in the Tap Project, visit the UNICEF Tap Project website at www.tapproject.org.

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Bottlemania: How Water Went on Sale and Why We Bought It

drinking water, outreach, sustainability, water privitization, water trade

A new book, Bottlemania by Elizabeth Royt, will focus on the complications of bottled water in today’s society. It will be available on May 13, 2008.

The book will address questions such as:

“Who owns our water? What happens when a bottled-water company stakes a claim on your town’s source? Should we have to pay for water? Is the stuff coming from the tap completely safe? And if so, how many chemicals are dumped in to make it potable? What’s the environmental footprint of making, transporting, and disposing of all those plastic bottles?”

For more information on bottled water, see the new Water Page on AlterNet. Tara Lohan, managing editor of AlterNet, has written several articles on the negative implications of bottled water in our world including This Year Give Up Bottle Water for Lent and What Would You Say to Coke’s Executives? (a review of ” a pioneering campaign that gives new meaning to message in a bottle“).

See the Water Books Page at the top of this web-log for more books on water.