Water Labels for Milk, Fruit, Meat, and More

agriculture, climate change, international, sustainability

Into the local grocery store for my weekly accruals, I browse the aisles for items on my shopping list…

Milk – 65 gallons of water for production per serving
Cherries – 90 gallons of water for production per serving
Eggs – 136 gallons of water for production per serving

I diligently note the amount of water used for production of each product clearly labeled on the back of the container and then place them into my cart.

Sound a bit far-fetched? Well, not so much if you were in Australia this week attending an international water conference in Adelaide.

James Hazelton, a professor from Macquarie University, suggested this approach for labeling of food products in Australia and beyond, according to ABC News. He cited the success of labeling water efficient appliances such as low-flow toilets and washing machines.

Indeed, perhaps if we were more aware of the amount of water used for production of our food products, we might be inclined to conserve water and eat a ‘low-flow’ diet.

Great idea, sir!

Have you checked your Water Footprint lately?